Asia Literary Review releases “All Korean Literature” issue!

Asia Literary Review CoverThis is a project I’m glad to say KTLIT had a hand in. We talked to the Review as they were planning things (actually, we also met them in Seoul and their posh Hong Kong offices!), and KTLIT provided  the team that interviewed (and translated the interview) with Shin Kyung-Sook. This volume is a treasure-trove of poetry, fiction, essay and interview, so you need to pick it up.^^

The folks at the Review have announced:

The Asia Literary Review is pleased to announce the publication of our spring issue. It will be in the post to subscribers on 8 May and available in bookshops and online thereafter. Our iPad app and eBook editions launch on the same day.

This edition focuses on Korea, both North and South, and includes an interview with Man Asian Literary Prize-winner Shin Kyung-sook; fiction by Kim Young-ha, Han Yujoo and Park Mingyu; poetry by the pre-eminent writer Ko Un and North Korean defector Jang Jin-sung; an essay by Korea expert Michael Breen and an article on North Korean cinema by Daniel Levitsky. We also feature a graphic novel from North Korea, the work of South Korean artist Won Seoung Won and a photo essay from North Korea by Simon Cockerell of Koryo Tours.

We have an email in to Kelly Falconer of the Review, and she will shortly be sending a list of places in Korea (and around the world) at which the Review can be purchased.

Anyone in Hong Kong should try to wrangle a ticket to the launching event at which Shin Kyung-sook, author of Please Look after Mother, will be guest of honour. The event is held in association with the Asia Society Hong Kong Center: http://asiasociety.org/hong-kong/events/please-look-after-mother

You can contact the Asia Literary Review right here at this link, for more information.

3 thoughts on “Asia Literary Review releases “All Korean Literature” issue!

  1. It sounds wonderful!

    I saw this item

    that shows that Korean music industry s not as fixated on high-prestige products as Korean literary establishment seems to be.

    Perhaps the literary people could learn something from the music people — that if one wants to actually be appreciated by a foreign audience, one must produce cultural products that are accessible to the audience.

  2. Pingback: ALR, Norton Anthology, 'Land' translated, Seoul Bookstores

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