Korean modern literature on the Wikipedia: Kim Sagwa goes up

Wikipedia Project LogoAs part of popularising Korean Modern Fiction, KTLit is still occasionally publishing Wikipedia Pages. Inspired by the book The Future of Silence Fiction by Korean Women, we have added the page for Kim Sagwa. Please feel free to edit it if you have anything to add..

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Kim Sagwa

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
This is a Korean name; the family name is Kim.
Born 1984 (age 31–32)
Language Korean
Nationality South Korean
Ethnicity Korean
Citizenship South Korean
Notable works “It’s One of Those the More-I’m-in-Motion-the-Weirder-it-Gets Days and It’s Really Blowing My Mind”
Korean name
Hangul 김사과

Kim Sagwa (born 1984) (Hangul김사과) is a South Korean writer. [1]

Life[edit]

Kim Sagwa (the name is a pen name and means “apple” in Korean, or in some cases “apology”) was born in 1984 in Seoul Korea where she also attended the Korean National University while studying Creative Writing. [2]

Work[edit]

Her first story was titled 02 (Yong’i) and for this work she was given the Changbi New Writer’s Prize, by the Ch’angjak kwa pip’yong publishing house. She has also written several other books including Mina (Mina, 2008), P’ul i numnunda (P’ul lies down, 2009), and T’ero ui shi (The Poetry of Terror, 2012). Kim is also the author of a book for young adults entitled, Na b Ch’aek (B and Chaek and Me, 2011). [3] In total she has written four novels and two short story collections. In 2016 “It’s One of Those the More-I’m-in-Motion-the-Weirder-it-Gets Days and It’s Really Blowing My Mind” became her first work published in English in the collection, The Future of Silence Fiction by Korean Women”. This work was first published in Korean in Spring of 2010 by in the journal, Consonant and Vowel, and was placed on the short list for the Young Writer’s Prize, given my Munhak Dongne Publishers. Kim has been compared to Jack Kerouac [4]. According to Bruce and Ju-Chan Fulton (Her English translators), Kim is “attuned to the pathology of life in Seoul, reflected in the national abnormally low birth rate and unusually high rates if divorce and suicide. [5]“It’s One of Those the More-I’m-in-Motion-the-Weirder-it-Gets Days and It’s Really Blowing My Mind” is one of the rare Korean works to explicitly confront psychosis and count a mental breakdown as the reason for a homicide. [6]

Works in Translation[edit]

  • It’s One of Those the More-I’m-in-Motion-the-Weirder-it-Gets Days and It’s Really Blowing My Mind in The Future of Silence Fiction by Korean Women

Works in Korean (Partial)[edit]

Short Stories

  • 02 (Yong’i)

Novel Length

  • Mina (Mina, 2008)
  • P’ul lies down (P’ul i numnunda, 2009)
  • The Poetry of Terror (T’ero ui shi, 2012)
  • B and Chaek and Me (Na b Ch’aek, 2011)

Awards[edit]

  • Changbi New Writer’s Prize,

References[edit]

  1. Jump up^ “Naver Search”. naver.com. Naver. Retrieved 28 March 2016.
  2. Jump up^ Bruce and Ju-Chan Fulton (2016). “About the Authors”. the Future of Silence. Brookline, MA: Zephyr Press. p. 185. ISBN 978-1938890178.
  3. Jump up^ “SF”. muse.com. Muse. Retrieved 28 March 2016.
  4. Jump up^ Bruce and Ju-Chan Fulton (2016). “Preface”. the Future of Silence. Brookline, MA: Zephyr Press. pp. xx. ISBN 978-1938890178.
  5. Jump up^ Bruce and Ju-Chan Fulton (2016). “Preface”. the Future of Silence. Brookline, MA: Zephyr Press. pp. xx. ISBN 978-1938890178.
  6. Jump up^ Bruce and Ju-Chan Fulton (2016). “Preface”. the Future of Silence. Brookline, MA: Zephyr Press. pp. xx. ISBN 978-1938890178.

External links[edit]

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